Alex Fischer

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Artist born ago in 1986.
Browse some available works and email for more information.

@alex_harold

@artofalexfischer

Statement

Alex Fischer is a visual artist who creates digital images, prints, paintings, sculptures, and installations. Conjuring and combining a riot of techniques and subjects Fischer's practice is an extension of painterly abstract-expressionism and photo-conceptualism. Each piece is twisted into existence through techno-biological happenstance. Compositions are discovered and interpreted through a mixture of conscious and unconscious forces. All reflections in the flow, made assuring the self that its strange moments existed. Each is a view of the real thing.

mock install of Just inches, Saturnine Clock, and Rocinante and Blue Rider
Justin, 2017 + Saturnine Clock, 2016 + Rocinante and Blue Rider, 2016 mock install
Emily, 2017, unique at size prints: 11×8½ inches, 22×17 inches, 33×25½ inches, 55×42½ inches
Emily, 2017
Holly, 2017, unique at size prints: 11×8½ inches, 22×17 inches, 33×25½ inches, 55×42½ inches
Holly, 2017
Jason, 2017, unique at size prints: 11×8½ inches, 22×17 inches, 33×25½ inches, 55×42½ inches
Jason, 2017
Just inches, 2017, unique at size prints: 11×8½ inches, 22×17 inches, 33×25½ inches, 55×42½ inches
Justin, 2017
Richard, 2017, unique at size prints: 11×8½ inches, 22×17 inches, 33×25½ inches, 55×42½ inches
Richard, 2017
Alex and Lana mock install, 2017
Alex and Lana mock install
Alex, 2017, unique at size prints: 11×8½ inches, 22×17 inches, 33×25½ inches, 55×42½ inches
Alex, 2017
Lana, 2017, unique at size prints: 11×8½ inches, 22×17 inches, 33×25½ inches, 55×42½ inches
Lana, 2017
Lacunal Heights, 2017, unique 60×40 inch print
Lacunal Heights, 2017
Lacunal Heights detail, 2017
Lacunal Heights detail
Lacunal Heights mock install, 2017
Lacunal Heights mock install
World Tulpa, 2017, unique 72×60 inch print
World Tulpa, 2017
World Tulpa detail, 2017
World Tulpa detail
A Malinche Double, 2016, one of ten 14×11 inch prints from photograph of oil paint and projected light
A Malinche Double, 2016
A Malinche Double framed, 2016
A Malinche Double framed
A Malinche Double install, 2016
A Malinche Double install
Dip, 2016, one of ten 14×11 inch prints
Dip, 2016
Ghost Horse, 2016, one of three 15×15 inch prints
Ghost Horse, 2016
Ghost Horse framed, 2016
Ghost Horse framed
In a Dream about a Ghost, 2016, one of two 72×57½ inch prints
In a Dream about a Ghost, 2016
In a Dream about a Ghost mock install, 2016
In a Dream about a Ghost mock install
In a Dream about a Ghost detail, 2016
In a Dream about a Ghost detail
Iron Lung, 2016, unique 60×90 inch print
Iron Lung, 2016
Iron Lung mock install, 2016
Iron Lung detail
Iron Lung mock install, 2016
Iron Lung mock install
Look Out Lucinda, 2016
Look Out Lucinda, 2016
Milne's Crossing, 2016, one of three 11×14 inch prints
Milne's Crossing, 2016
Milne's Crossing framed, 2016
Milne's Crossing framed
Night Outside, 2016, one of three 12½×10 inch prints
Day Outside, 2016
Night Outside, 2016, one of three 12½×10 inch prints
Night Outside, 2016
Pet, Casper and Hesperie, 2016, 48×54 inch oil and acrylic on canvas
Pet, Casper and Hesperie, 2016
Pet, 2016, one of three 12×9⅗ inch prints from photograph of oil and acrylic on canvas
Pet, 2016
Casper, 2016, one of three 12×9⅗ inch prints from photograph of oil and acrylic on canvas
Casper, 2016
Hesperie, 2016, one of three 12×9⅗ inch prints from photograph of oil and acrylic on canvas
Hesperie, 2016
Pluck from the Brush, 2016, one of ten 14×11 inch prints
Pluck from the Brush, 2016
Rocinante and Blue Rider, 2016, one of two 60×48 inch prints
Rocinante and Blue Rider, 2016
Rocinante and Blue Rider detail, 2016
Rocinante and Blue Rider detail
Rocinante and Blue Rider mock install, 2016
Rocinante and Blue Rider mock install
Saturnine Clock, 2016, 72×57½ inch print
Saturnine Clock, 2016
Saturnine Clock detail, 2016
Saturnine Clock detail
Saturnine Clock mock install, 2016
Saturnine Clock mock install
Save Cave, 2016, one of ten 14×11 inch prints from photograph of oil paint and projected light
Save Cave, 2016
Save Cave B&WBlue, 2016, one of ten 14×11 inch prints from black & white photograph of oil paint and projected light
Save Cave B&WBLUE, 2016
Season V, 2016, 72×48 inch oil and acrylic on panel
Season V, 2016
Season V detail, 2016
Season V detail
Season V install at Circuit Gallery, 2016
Season V install
Super Seed B&WBlue, 2016, one of ten 14×11 inch prints from black & white photograph of oil paint and projected light
Super Seed B&WBLUE, 2016
Super Seed, 2016, one of ten 14×11 inch prints from photograph of oil paint and projected light
Super Seed, 2016
Quick Rise Pizza Flower, 2016, one of ten 14×11 inch prints
Quick Rise Pizza Flower, 2016
Super Seed and Willow Fire, 2016, framed 14×11 inch prints
Super Seed & Willow Fire framed
Thistlee Keeper, 2016, one of three 21¼×17 inch prints
Thistlee Keeper, 2016
Wave V, 2016, one of ten 14×11 inch prints from photograph of oil paint and projected light
Wave V, 2016
Willow Fire, 2016, one of ten 14×11 inch prints from photograph of oil paint and projected light
Willow Fire, 2016
With Picabia's Hand, 2016, one of ten 14×11 inch prints from photograph of oil paint and projected light
With Picabia's Hand, 2016
With Picabia's Hand earlier, 2016, one of ten 14×11 inch prints from photograph of oil paint and projected light
With Picabia's Hand earlier, 2016

Exhibition: Trace • Copy • Render

Alex Fischer, Rita Maas, Susana Reisman, Sharon Switzer
Curated by Claire Sykes for Circuit Gallery @ Prefix ICA, fall 2016
Click to read exhibition statement

This exhibition brings together four artists who are thinking about origins, process, materials, and labour as they explore the possibilities and implications of working digitally.

At the heart of Trace • Copy • Render is a shared interest in revealing, hiding, and playing with digital and material processes and manipulations, and the coincidence or disconnect (as the case may be) between final output and the myriad steps involved in the process of its realization.

Alex Fischer is an artist whose practice deliberately blurs and confounds the borders between media, and constitutes digital-image making as an extension of traditional artistic media and concerns. He uses advanced digital imaging techniques to manipulate found source imagery, to layer and build-up complex new compositions that are often hard to pin down as to medium or process, and which maintain a tension between the physical and the virtual, the original and the copy, the index and the trace.

In a fascinating inversion of his work on the computer, Fischer just as easily jumps out from the digital realm—off the virtual canvas—and performs ‘photoshop' by physically copying, tracing, blending, adding layers and various effects to printed and painted works. Fischer's series of work in Trace • Copy • Render offers a self-reflexive glimpse into his process of creation and concerns and includes paintings, projections, and prints. (more...)

– Claire Sykes, August 2016


000000, 2015, one of two 25½×20 inch prints
000000, 2015
0c, 2015, one of two 25½×20 inch prints
0c, 2015
1b, 2015, one of two 25½×20 inch prints
1b, 2015
1b install, 2015, mockup of 16×20 inch print with wall vinyl
1b mock install with vinyl
1b install, 2015, mockup of 16×20 inch print
1b mock install
3, 2015, one of two 25½×20 inch prints
3, 2015
Beach Landing, 2015, exhibition AP
Beach Landing, 2015
Blue Lemon, 2015, one of two 25½×20 inch prints
Blue Lemon, 2015
Blue Lemon detail, 2015
Blue Lemon detail
Blue Lemon mock install, 2015
Blue Lemon mock install
Bowl, 2015, one of two 25½×20 inch prints
Bowl, 2015
Brown Lemon, 2015, one of two 25½×20 inch prints
Brown Lemon, 2015
Green Scrape, 2015, exhibition AP
Green Scrape, 2015
HA, 2015, one of two 14×21 inch prints
HA, 2015
My My Mind Vs Brain, 2015, one of two 20×16 inch prints
My My Mind Vs Brain, 2015
Official, 2015, unique 40×60in and 90×60 inch prints
Official, 2015
Official mock install, 2015
Official mock install
Official install, 2015
Official detail
Real Safe Myth, 2015, one of two 10×9 inch prints
Real Safe Myth, 2015
Red Lemon, 2015, one of two 30×24 inch prints
Red Lemon, 2015
Untitled22, 2015, one of two 30×24 inch prints
Untitled22, 2015
Was A Fish, 2015, 16×20 inch print
Was A Fish, 2015
VII, 2015, unique 60×48 inch print from digital painting
VII, 2015
VII 冯声贵 Feng Shui Gui, 2015, 60×48 inch oil on canvas
VII 冯声贵 Feng Shui Gui, 2015
VII 叶安 Ye An, 2015, 60×48 inch oil on canvas
VII 叶安 Ye An, 2015
VII 林建 Lin Jian, 2015, 60×48 inch oil on canvas
VII 林建 Lin Jian, 2015
VII 江明 Jiang Ming, 2015, 60×48 inch oil on canvas
VII 江明 Jiang Ming, 2015
VII 陈山 Chen Shan, 2015, 60×48 inch oil on canvas
VII 陈山 Chen Shan, 2015
VII 陈文波 Chen Wen Bo, 2015, 60×48 inch oil on canvas
VII 陈文波 Chen Wen Bo, 2015
VII 陈秋林 Chen Qiu L inches, 2015, 60×48 inch oil on canvas
VII 陈秋林 Chen Qiu Lin, 2015
VII 6000 Arch, 2015 VII 6000 Arch, 2015 VII 6000 Arch, 2015
VII 6000 Arch, an 82×48×40in acrylic and aluminium arch bolstering 240 6×4in acrylic paintings on Dura-lar
VII 6000 Arch is a sculptural display frame for 240 editions of a VII 6000.

Exhibition: 1, 7, and 6000

solo exhibition at O'Born Contemporary, spring 2015 Click to read exhibition statement

(1)

On the occasion of Alex Fischer's fourth solo exhibition with O'Born Contemporary, he problematizes the single image by its very conversion into multiple, nearly identical forms. A digital original is here reproduced as 1 digital print, 7 large oil paintings, and 6000 small acrylic paintings. Through this multi-modal exhibition, Fischer deliberates on the nature of art with its value systems and capitalist patrimony.

Current agricultural trends demonstrate that when tomatoes are grown, the aim is to direct natural processes, taking agency over evolution. Like all biological species, the tomato plant contains a genetic copy of itself inside every cell of its being. Repetition and versioning are as much a rule in agriculture as they are in human life. Conversely, uniqueness and independence of mind are selling points when it comes to art. There is an established value in originality.1

(7)

Each of the 7 oil paintings was completed by an equal number of painters working in Xiamen, China. Fischer puts the work of these trained hands in direct visual argument with the mechanically reproduced print: he suggests deliberation about the capitalist mechanism and simultaneously entertains his moral ambiguity within this landscape of unapologetic consumptive socio-culture.

The controversy here may be in the fact that Fischer criticizes the capitalist system by highlighting elements that are uncomfortable to acknowledge while fully engaging with capitalism's ideologies through the kaleidoscope of fine art and its market. He grows the pieces, puts them under optimal lighting, and creates versions at price points to invite the viewer to buy.

(6000)

An arched shelf bolsters 6000 small sheets of th inches, transparent plastic. Hundreds have already been painted, revealing that they exist as an assemblage of tiles that, when properly arranged, mimic their parent image. Fischer will paint the remaining sheets on demand as they are requested and will continue this practice alongside his other projects.

Artwork as a commodity is not valuable per se– its value is the result of an ongoing and never ending social negotiation. That being said, the work of art, and painting specifically, is an object that bears a concrete, almost measurable evidence of labour on its surface.2 Paintings are worked over and leave a trace of the individual mark maker. Each edition in 1, 7, and 6000 shows on its surface the inevitable difference made during translation between parent image and end product. Each image is the real thing.

– Alex Fischer, February 2015

1. This idea is commensurate with remarks issued by Ben Davis: It is the uniquely middle-class nature of creative labor in the visual arts [that] would seem to explain its alternative emphasis on the individual, that is, on the virtues of personality and small production, as well as a whole host of other stylistic tics and affectations(...) visual art's characteristic questioning or ironic attitude; the value of the artist's signature and the 'artist's statement' that are associated with it. Davis, Ben. 9.5 Theses on Art and Class - Commerce and Consciousness. Chicago:Haymarket Books, 2013. PDF file.

2. Graw, Isabelle. Thinking through Painting - Reflexivity and Agency beyond the Canvas. Sternberg Press, 2012. Page 56.

1, 7, and 6000 at O'Born Contemporary
Install of VII, 2015
Install of VII 江明 Jiang Ming, VII 林建 Lin Jian, VII 陈文波 Chen Wen Bo, VII 陈秋林 Chen Qiu Lin. Each a 60×48 inch oil on canvas
Install of VII 叶安 Ye An, VII 冯声贵 Feng Shui Gui, VII 陈山 Chen Shan. Each a 60×48 inch oil on canvas
Detail of VII 陈文波 Chen Wen Bo
An 82×48×40in acrylic and aluminium arch bolstering 240 editions of VII 6000, each edition is a 6×4in acrylic paintings on Dura-lar
Detail of VII 6000 Arch
Detail of VII 6000 Arch
Detail of VII 6000 Arch
Detail of VII 6000 Arch
Individually framed editions from VII 6000
Editions 53 and 173 from VII 6000
Representation of all 6000 editions in VII 6000
Promotional mock install of VII series
Promotional mock install of VII series
VII 6000 a1, 2015
VII 6000 a2, 2015
VII 6000 a3, 2015
VII 6000 a4, 2015
VII 6000 a5, 2015
VII 6000 a6, 2015
VII 6000 a7, 2015
VII 6000 a8, 2015
VII 6000 a9, 2015
VII 6000 a10, 2015
VII 6000 a11, 2015
VII 6000 a12, 2015
VII 6000 b1, 2015
VII 6000 b2, 2015
VII 6000 b3, 2015
VII 6000 b4, 2015
VII 6000 b5, 2015
VII 6000 b6, 2015
VII 6000 b7, 2015
VII 6000 b8, 2015
VII 6000 b9, 2015
VII 6000 b10, 2015
VII 6000 b11, 2015
VII 6000 b12, 2015
VII 6000 c1, 2015
VII 6000 c2, 2015
VII 6000 c3, 2015
VII 6000 c4, 2015
VII 6000 c5, 2015
VII 6000 c6, 2015
VII 6000 c7, 2015
VII 6000 c8, 2015
VII 6000 c9, 2015
VII 6000 c10, 2015
VII 6000 c11, 2015
VII 6000 c12, 2015
VII 6000 d1, 2015
VII 6000 d2, 2015
VII 6000 d3, 2015
VII 6000 d4, 2015
VII 6000 d5, 2015
VII 6000 d6, 2015
VII 6000 d7, 2015
VII 6000 d8, 2015
VII 6000 d9, 2015
VII 6000 d10, 2015
VII 6000 d11, 2015
VII 6000 d12, 2015
VII 6000 e1, 2015
VII 6000 e2, 2015
VII 6000 e3, 2015
VII 6000 e4, 2015
VII 6000 e5, 2015
VII 6000 e6, 2015
VII 6000 e7, 2015
VII 6000 e8, 2015
VII 6000 e9, 2015
VII 6000 e10, 2015
VII 6000 e11, 2015
VII 6000 e12, 2015
VII 6000 f1, 2015
VII 6000 f2, 2015
VII 6000 f3, 2015
VII 6000 f4, 2015
VII 6000 f5, 2015
VII 6000 f6, 2015
VII 6000 f7, 2015
VII 6000 f8, 2015
VII 6000 f9, 2015
VII 6000 f10, 2015
VII 6000 f11, 2015
VII 6000 f12, 2015
VII 6000 g1, 2015
VII 6000 g2, 2015
VII 6000 g3, 2015
VII 6000 g4, 2015
VII 6000 g5, 2015
VII 6000 g6, 2015
VII 6000 g7, 2015
VII 6000 g8, 2015
VII 6000 g9, 2015
VII 6000 g10, 2015
VII 6000 g11, 2015
VII 6000 g12, 2015
VII 6000 h1, 2015
VII 6000 h2, 2015
VII 6000 h3, 2015
VII 6000 h4, 2015
VII 6000 h5, 2015
VII 6000 h6, 2015
VII 6000 h7, 2015
VII 6000 h8, 2015
VII 6000 h9, 2015
VII 6000 h10, 2015
VII 6000 h11, 2015
VII 6000 h12, 2015
VII 6000 i1, 2015
VII 6000 i2, 2015
VII 6000 i3, 2015
VII 6000 i4, 2015
VII 6000 i5, 2015
VII 6000 i6, 2015
VII 6000 i7, 2015
VII 6000 i8, 2015
VII 6000 i9, 2015
VII 6000 i10, 2015
VII 6000 i11, 2015
VII 6000 i12, 2015
VII 6000 j1, 2015
VII 6000 j2, 2015
VII 6000 j3, 2015
VII 6000 j4, 2015
VII 6000 j5, 2015
VII 6000 j6, 2015
VII 6000 j7, 2015
VII 6000 j8, 2015
VII 6000 j9, 2015
VII 6000 j10, 2015
VII 6000 j11, 2015
VII 6000 j12, 2015

Angler, 2014, one of two 25½×20 inch prints
Angler, 2014
Aviary, 2014
Garden Spell, 2014, one of five 17×17 inch prints
Garden Spell, 2014
Garden Spell framed, 2014
Garden Spell framed
George's Cuttlefish, 2014
George's Cuttlefish, 2014
Inside The Faberge Egg, 2014, one of two 25×20 inch prints
Inside The Faberge Egg, 2014
M, 2014, one of two 20×16 inch prints
M, 2014
Moore, 2014, unique 75×60in and 30×37½ inch prints
Moore, 2014
Moore mock install 1, 2014 Moore mock install 2, 2014
Moore mock installs
On Cotton, 2014, unique 15×12 inch print
On Cotton, 2014
Parlor, 2014, one of two 30×24 inch prints
Parlor, 2014
Planet Print, 2014, one of two 17×17 inch prints
Planet Print, 2014
Supersymmetry II, 2014, 96×96in digital composite
Supersymmetry II, 2014
Supersymmetry II detail, 2014
Supersymmetry II detail
Supersymmetry II, 2014, 96×96 inch screenprint on sintra
Supersymmetry II sintra
Supersymmetry II, 2014, 96×96 inch screenprint on plexi
Supersymmetry II plexi
Wish You Were Here, 2014, one of three 20×16 inch prints
Wish You Were Here, 2014
Wizard Eyes, 2014, one of three 12½×10 inch prints
Wizard Eyes, 2014
A General Impression, 2013, 11×8½ inch exhibition AP
A General Impression, 2013
Ammonite, 2013, 27×15×40 inch mixed media sculpture. driftwood, clay, silicone, cotton, paint, glass, plastic, foam, acrylic, steel
Ammonite, 2013
Blood Bowl, 2013, one of three 15×12 inch print
Blood Bowl, 2013
Brush Wor, 2013, one of two 20×16 inch prints
Brush Work, 2013
dDsc, 2013, 96×48 inch exhibition AP
Disc, 2013
Disc detail, 2013
Disc detail
Disc mock install, 2013
Disc mock install
Feather Feeder, 2013, 36&frac25×42; inch exhibition AP
Feather Feeder, 2013
Flesh Fruit, 2013, one of four 10½×8 inch prints
Flesh Fruit, 2013
Is Water, 2013, 24¼×40¾ inch exhibition AP
Is Water, 2013
Jelly Portrait, 2013, 27×25⅝ inch exhibition AP
Jelly Portrait, 2013
Jelly Portrait mock install, 2013
Jelly Portrait mock install
Lichen, 2013, 35×35×75 inch mixed media sculpture. foam, plaster, steel, printed fabric.
Lichen, 2013
Lichen, 2013, detail of mixed media sculpture
Lichen detail
Loop (Santiago), 2013, 43×34 inch exhibition AP
Loop (Santiago), 2013
Markered Market, 2013, unique 18×28½ inch print and two 12×19 inch prints
Markered Market, 2013
Mouth, 2013, 96×144in digital painting
Mouth, 2013
Mouth mock install, 2013, 96×144 inch exhibition dye sub on textile
Mouth mock install
Nervous System Preserver, 2013, 13¾×13¾×2¾in nylon 3d print
Nervous System Preserver, 2013
Ready To Ooze, 2013, 63⅛×37⅝ inch exhibition AP
Ready To Ooze, 2013
Ready To Ooze install, 2013
Ready To Ooze install
Seeding, 2013, 21×14 inch exhibition AP
Seeding, 2013
Shellfish Cells, 2013, 9⅝×7⅝ inch exhibition AP
Shellfish Cells, 2013
Similar Image Object (b), 2013, 15¾×47¼ screenprint on mirror
Similar Image Object (b), 2013
Similar Image Object (b) screen, 2013
Similar Image Object (b) screen
Untitled Head, 2013, one of two 24×21⅗ inch prints
Untitled Head, 2013

Exhibition: Dry Pixels And Wet Molecules

solo exhibition at O'Born Contemporary, winter 2013 Click to read exhibition statement

In Dry Pixels And Wet Molecules Alex Fischer counter-poses the primordial origins of biology against today's dominant technology-based vernacular. In earnest, the artist acknowledges through his practice elements peculiar to the time of his being. Put in alternative terms, Fischer concedes that the acts of being and becoming are wholly different now than at any time in our recent or distant past.

Dry Pixels And Wet Molecules poses a valuable and contemporary question using sensory terms--can the digital reconcile With the physical? The works of art comprising this materially varied exhibition reveal themselves as both answers to and instigators of this question. Through digital manipulations, sculpture, and installation, Fischer convinces his audience that technology is not simply an imbricate to the physical and the palpable but rather supersedes both.

The multi-modal moment in which art-making has found itself produces what could be called moist media, a curious but worthwhile corollary to the Mcluhan's cold media of days past. Absorbing this idea, Fischer wedges himself between the dry, cold of the pixel and the wetness of biomolecules. Ultimately suggesting that we are living in a post-digital world, the artist exposes a tactility and precision with his imagery that in effect surpasses the daily surroundings we perceive with our own eyes and bodies.

– Alex Fischer, September 2013

Seeding install
Install at O'Born Contemporary
Lichen install infront of Nervous System Preserver and Feather Feeder
Lichen detail
Lichen install
Lichen install infront of Feather Feeder and Shellfish Cells
Shellfish Cells install
Nervous System Preserver and Feather Feeder install
Feather Feeder install
Feather Feeder detail
Nervous System Preserver install from side
Nervous System Preserver install
Mouth install
Mouth detail
Mangrove Down and Mouth install
Mangrove Down install
Mangrove Down detail
Mangrove Down and Ammonite install
Ammonite install
Ammonite detail
Similar Image Object (b) install
Similar Image Object (b) install
Install at O'Born Contemporary
Ready To Ooze install
A General Impression install
Disc install
Disc detail
Install at O'Born Contemporary
Jelly Portrait install

Adobe Mask, 2012, one of three 27⅞×22½ inch prints
Adobe Mask, 2012
Artists Image, 2012, one of five 11¾×8⅝ inch prints
Artists Image, 2012
Big Blue, 2012, 2560×1440pixel digital composite
Big Blue, 2012
bow 2012, one of three 15½×23⅝ inch prints
bow, 2012
Cell Pattern mock install, 2012, 96×96 inch print
Cell Pattern mock install
Clear Greens mock install, 2012, 80×120 inch screenprint on plexi
Clear Greens mock install
Daily, 2012, one of three 57½×40 inch prints
Daily, 2012
Daily mock install, 2012
Daily mock install
Deep Deep Under, 2012, one of three 15×12 inch prints
Deep Deep Under, 2012
Earlier, 2012, one of three 16¾×12⅗ inch prints
Earlier, 2012
Jame, 2012, one of two 22½×15 inch prints
Jame, 2012
Jame mock install, 2012
Jame mock install
Mangrove Down, 2012, 74¾×45¼ inch exhibition AP
Mangrove Down, 2012
Mangrove Up, 2012, 74¾×45¼ inch print
Mangrove Up, 2012
Mangrove Down mock install, 2012
Mangrove Down mock install
Seer, 2012, one of two 28×28 inch prints
Seer, 2012
Straw Man, 2012, 96×180 inch exhibition AP
Straw Man, 2012
Supercollider, 2012, one of three 48×48 inch prints
Supercollider, 2012
Up, 2012, one of three 22×17½ inch prints
Up, 2012
Whale Bra inches, 2012, one of two 30×20 inch prints
Whale Brain, 2012

Exhibition: Beyond The Fall

solo exhibition at
Galerie BAC, winter 2013
O'Born Contemporary, fall 2012
Click to read exhibition statement

Artists must take responsibility for representing the time in which they live.

The images of Beyond The Fall come from what has become the predominant first-world interface: The personal computer and internet capable device is now the primary filter by which broad swaths of people interact and know themselves. These technologies have the ability to snake our attentions, beliefs and desires, influencing cognition and our experience of the world.

In order to represent these paradigm shifts, Alex Fischer reifies the low-culture of individualistic habits and persuasions to be in dialogue with the ripe philosophy of high art. His chosen medium of digital collage perfectly compliments his artistic process, by which he paints together images from a collection of digital sources. Each piece concedes to multiple interpretations due to Fischer's choice to obscure the visual space of the image into near abstraction. The narratives encompass characters, scenes, and symbols with all of their ambiguity, insight, and metaphysical baggage on display. The content originates from their adaptations to and the impact of this current age.

– Alex Fischer, August 2012

Island and Daily install
Island install
Daily install
Daily, Paradise, and Beyond The Fall install
Paradise install with vinyl
Paradise, and Beyond The Fall install
Good Grief and Blackfoot install
Adobe Mask detail
Adobe Mask and Myrrha install
Myrrha, Kind of Blue, and Aurora install
Kind of Blue, Aurora, and Cooks Cape install
Cooks Cape and Parrots install
Parrots install
Supercollider install
Purple Jesus, bow, Supercollider and Greens install
Greens vinyl install
Purple Jesus and bow install
Bluenose, Parrots, Myrrha, and Artists Image install
Beyond The Fall and The Infant and The Garden Hose install
Straw Man install
Straw Man, Cell Pattern, Beyond The Fall, and Purple Jesus install
Cell Pattern vinyl install
Aurora install

Aurora, 2011, one of five 12×12⅗ inch prints
Aurora, 2011
Aurora framed, 2011
Aurora framed
Batgirl, 2011, one of four 17×12 inch prints
Batgirl, 2011
Beyond The Fall, 2011, one of three 43×64 inch prints
Beyond The Fall, 2011
Blackfoot, 2011, one of five 15×9⅛ inch prints
Blackfoot, 2011
Blackfoot framed, 2011
Blackfoot framed
Bluenose, 2011, one of four 15×11 inch prints
Bluenose, 2011
Bluenose framed, 2011
Bluenose framed
Island, 2011, 48×24 inch exhibition AP
Island, 2011
island framed, 2011
Island install at Angell Gallery
Kind Of Blue, 2011, one of five 11⅛×13⅛ inch prints
Kind Of Blue,
Kind Of Blue mock install, 2011
Kind Of Blue mock install
Myrrha, 2011, one of five 9⅞×7½ inch prints
Myrrha, 2011
Paradise, 2011, one of four 15×11 inch prints
Paradise, 2011
Parrots, 2011, 60×84 inch exhibition AP
Parrots, 2011
parrots install, 2011
Parrots install at Volta NY 2012
Purple Jesus, 2011, one of five 13⅛×12¾ inch prints
Purple Jesus, 2011
Purple Jesus framed, 2011
Purple Jesus framed
The Infant And The Garden Hose, 2011, 47 inch diameter exhibition AP
The Infant And The Garden Hose, 2011
Untitled Gaze, 2011, one of four 15×11 inch prints
Untitled Gaze, 2011
W9 - Alex Fischer Artists Book, 2010

W9 – Alex Fischer

Produced in 2010 alongside Alex Fischer's inaugural exhibition with O'Born Contemporary. W9 survey's the first years of Fischer's artistic practice. Click image above for more views.

Published by O'Born Contemporary
Designed by Wassenaar [W9]
Printed and bound in Brampton, ON, Canada
ISBN: 985-4564-6979-02

Features

  • 21 high quality plates
  • Prismatic Wave: A conversation with Alex Fischer by Noel Rodo-Vankeulen
  • 92 pages
  • Edition of 500
  • Signed by the Artist

Demensions

  • 8×6×⅖ines

Materials

  • Perfect cut Bare Eska Board cover
  • Matte black foil stamp title
  • Milbank Linen Black Cloth wrap
  • 80LB silk paper (plates)
  • 60LB blue offset (interview)

$36.00 CADBuy Now

per book, + tax & shipping

Artists Retreat, 2010, one of five 16×14⅗ inch prints
Artists Retreat, 2010
Artists Retreat framed, 2010
Artists Retreat framed
Beach House, 2010, one of five 15×9 inch prints
Beach House, 2010
Body Of Eris, 2010, 74×48×18 inch mixed media sculpture Body Of Eris, 2010, 74×48×18 inch mixed media sculpture Body Of Eris, 2010, 74×48×18 inch mixed media sculpture Body Of Eris, 2010, 74×48×18 inch mixed media sculpture Body Of Eris, 2010, 74×48×18 inch mixed media sculpture
Body Of Eris, 2010
Bring Home The Bacon, 2010, one of five 15×20 inch prints
Bring Home The Bacon, 2010
Cooks Cape, 2010, 60×84 inch exhibition AP
Cooks Cape, 2010
Dweller, 2010, one of five 11⅖×9⅞ inch prints
Dweller, 2010
ed, 2010, one of five 11×11 inch prints
Ed, 2010
Figure Head, 2010, one of four 57×55 inch prints
Figure Head, 2010
Fungus Philosopher, 2010, one of ten 9⅛×7⅞ inch prints
Fungus Philosopher, 2010
Good Grief, 2010, one of ten 22×16 inch prints
Good Grief, 2010
Good Grief framed, 2010
Good Grief framed
Grandfather Wreath, 2010, mixed media sculpture
Grandfather Wreath, 2010
Groud, 2010, exhibition AP
Ground, 2010
Knight, 2010, mixed media sculpture
Knight, 2010
Monster Mash, 2010, one of five 9⅛×7⅞ inch prints
Monster Mash, 2010
Oregon Accidental, 2010, one of fifty 20×15 inch prints

Oregon Accidental, 2010

  • Special Edition of 50
  • 20×15 inch print
  • 2in matte
  • 10.3 mil 192 gsm archival Epson Enhanced Matte paper
  • Signed by the Artist

$200.00 CADBuy Now

per edition, + tax & shipping

Plans For A Home, 2010, one of five 24×20½ inch prints
Plans For A Home, 2010
Salt Lake Schulnik, 2010, one of five 13×12 inch prints
Salt Lake Schulnik, one of five 13×12 inch prints
Spider From Venus, 2010, 33×13×16 inch mixed media sculpture Spider From Venus, 2010, 33×13×16 inch mixed media sculpture Spider From Venus, 2010, 33×13×16 inch mixed media sculpture
Spider From Venus, 2010
Teen Dream, 2010, one of ten 11⅖×9⅞ inch prints
Teen Dream, 2010
The Invisible Man Returns, 2010, 47⅞×32 inch exhibition AP
The Invisible Man Returns, 2010
Three Fates, 2010, 60×92 inch exhibition AP
Three Fates, 2010
Trouble On Volcano Sundae, 2010, one of five 16×14⅗ inch prints
Trouble On Volcano Sundae, 2010
Trouble On Volcano Sundae framed, 2010
Trouble On Volcano Sundae framed
Untitled Greens, 2010, one of five 15×20 inch prints
Untitled Greens, 2010
Venus, 2010, one of three 14½×10½ inch prints
Venus, 2010

Exhibition: Smarter Today

solo exhibition at O'Born Contemporary, fall 2010 Click to read exhibition statement

Smarter Today offers a human view of futurist landscapes, a view that explores the ideologies and projections of society through the lens of contemporary art.

Alex Fischer composes his figures and landscapes by assembling a variety of visual and conceptual sources. Keeping in mind that ideas of the future are inevitably the fastest to change, Fischer maintains that human nature is a fallible and susceptible state.

Technological advancement and machine generations have vastly outpaced the tradition of the average human life. As a society, we have adapted to accept the pace at which vast differences and contrasts will influence our modes of being. All projections of which are unpredictable beyond our present context. Today more than ever before, we situate ourselves less as individuals and more as the product of multiple networks. While this network theory suggests a node's relationship to other networks is more important than its own uniqueness, we find a backlash of reflection on individual circumstance and identity.

The subjects and characters of Smarter Today are reflections on the syncretism that created them. Their exterior identities have been extricated to include all of their precursors. They are heterogeneous and intermingled with their environments, yet maintain their subjectivity in the face of a post-structuralist world.

– Alex Fischer, September 2010

Article: Alex Fischer: Smarter Today

by Rachel Anne Farquharson, January 2011

Painting as a practice, before all other media, has undergone copious amounts of inspection from without, and introspection from within. This may be because, as critic and lecturer Caoimhim Mac Giolla Leith suggests, recent painting seems ‘to be characterised by a persistent refusal of its own self-containment,'1 a fitting statement given today's globalised and technologically progressive climate. Even more complex is the analysis of an artist practice which relies upon digital techniques and modes of production to create what is finally thought of as a painted work. Such is the case with Alex Fischer, whose recent show at O'Born Contemporary in Toronto speaks to a curatorial trend in the redefinition of the painted canvas within art's discourse. As the first solo exhibit hosted at the gallery's significantly more artworthy (re)location on Ossington Avenue, the pluralism inherent in the works of Smarter Today bespeaks a double bind of low culture in dialogue with high art that first resurfaced in the practices of post-modern painters like Neo Rauch (B. 1960) and David Salle (B. 1952).

Click to read more

Though the last decade has seen more than seven major international exhibitions in dialogue with painting as gesture and act, the theme of medium redefinition is not hackneyed in the capable hands of this twenty-four year old MVS student at the University of Toronto. By turns virtual maverick and sculptural visionary, Fischer outputs two-dimensional imagery with an object status that feels palpable. Figure Head, 2010, which bears down on the viewer at 140 x 145 cm, invites entry and interaction, the centrally located, dog-faced girl just grotesque and fragmented enough to evoke Francis Bacon. Bacon, who intended ‘to distort [the figure] far beyond the appearance, but in the distortion to bring it back to a recording of the appearance'2 finds a voice once more in the flurry of layers that both dis- and re-assemble Fischer's complex compositions. Figure Head draws upon the veritable archive of images that the internet has become, capturing a glimpse of today's epistemological development in the process. The artist's espousal of digital collage and illustration ‘allows [him] to visually interpolate resources'3 in a way that speaks to humanity's greater consciousness and, furthermore, to its very future. Quite simply, as a race we are careening towards an intersubjectivity that makes each of us a flesh-bound collage of experience, landscapes, and concepts.

This is perhaps the most salient point that Fischer advances with a piece like Untitled Greens, 2010, a moderately sized work that takes as its conceptual and physical ground a photograph of a forest by Traci Matlock and Ashley MacLean. The image has been altered such that its tone and formal nature combine the Real according to Hal Foster with an ephemeral quality that shrouds most people's childhood memories. The idea that forests are vehicles for strange and mythological happenings is one transmitted from generation to generation in many cultures. Fischer uses the accumulation of memory, belief, and narrative to make a statement about humankind. The near dissolution of forest trees contrasted against the appearance of ghoulish faces grafted to their trunks visualizes the interplay between the real and the mystical that the artist is trying to access. Although Fischer has spoken of his own upbringing in the Ontario countryside as a cognitive influence, the images he employs already have a registered meaning that he maintains is important to acknowledge. In appropriating the work of other artists, Fischer always attempts to gain a good grasp of both the context in which the image was created and the nature of the artist's practice itself. Thus, once the artist found Matlock and MacLean on Flickr, he followed their practice and artistic output for several years prior to starting a dialogue with them and their work.

Finally, it is the rigid duality of mind and body as a primary mode of existing in the world that Fischer rejects, using the phenomenology of perception suggested by philosopher Maurice Merleau-Ponty to advance his own novel conclusions. Consider a populace whose foundation is the collective embodiment of each other's personalities and souls. Just as figures are iterated in Fischer's art through the superimposition of images onto each other, each person is philosophically a summation of his or her cohabitants. The large scale work, Three Fates, 2010, is a reflection of the syncretism that the artist holds responsible for the creation of his body of illustrated subjects and characters. The largely barren urban landscape here depicted is not as bleak as conventional subjectivity would have us believe—to Fischer, the diluted palette is more peaceful than forbidding. In this future world, subjectivity is no longer useful therefore evolutionary theory would demand that it atrophies like a muscle in disuse, allowing us to live in a relatively neutral, colourless culture. Though the landscape is only host to two people, the artist conceives each person as a collective of thousands. Actually, the composition is very crowded, laughed Fischer when questioned about the piece. What is obvious to him seems ironic given the few objects to behold in many of the works in Smarter Today.

Three Fates is evidence of a recent challenge Fischer has created for himself: to be in compositional dialogue with the traditional diptych/triptych. Bisecting the large proscenium arch arrangement in this piece is a totem pole, imbued with enough life force to be considered the third fate in the image's narrative. Other possibilities for this third figure are the viewer or, interestingly, the art work positioned directly across from Three Fates in the gallery. A concerted curatorial choice by the artist and O'Born Contemporary director Natalie MacNamara, the opposing image is the tripartite Cooks Cape, 2010. Thus, the two large works were made to face each other to ignite a conversation about their similar obedience of an art historical compositional precedent. The challenge, or as Fischer describes it, risk in working with the diptych or triptych format is allowing an image to exist when different realities are positioned to reflect each other—the adjacent two/three sides expose the fact that their subjectivities do not necessarily agree. There is a risk in getting lost in the work, as if the worlds are facing mirrors wherein your reflection becomes so dislocated that it can actually disappear. Theoretically, the totem in Three Fates acts as the joint in a mirror between the two subject bodies, putting both or either in danger of extinction. Frankly, in an imagined world where subjectivity has been eliminated and only collective identities exist, the transformation of material bodies to virtual whispers seems completely à propos.

Originally posted on artbarrage.com

1. Caoimhim Mac Giolla Leith, Surveying Contemporary Painting, Circa, No. 109, (2004): 58
2. David Sylvester, Interviews with Francis Bacon, (London: Thames & Hudson,1993), 40
3. Alex Fischer, First Year Practice Draft, 15 November, 2010


Crewdson Landscaping And Design, 2009, one of five 17×17 inch prints
Crewdson Landscaping And Design, 2009
Fischer's Garden, 2009, one of five 17×17 inch prints
Fischer's Garden, 2009
Hilde-brand Graffiti, 2009, one of two 36×54 inch prints
Hilde-brand Graffiti, 2009
Julia Waits At Kims Crag, 2009, one of five 17×17 inch prints
Julia Waits At Kims Crag,
Our Ground, 2009, one of three 60×60 inch prints
Our Ground, 2009
Polyester Boat, 2009, one of five 17×17 inch prints
Polyester Boat, 2009
Santiago Sara Brown, 2009, one of five 17×17 inch prints
Santiago Sara Brown, 2009
Safarti's Walk, 2009, one of five 17×17 inch prints
Safarti's Walk, 2009
Sarsen For The Mother Of The Bride, 2009, one of five 17×17 inch prints
Sarsen For The Mother Of The Bride, 2009
South West Esteem, 2009, one of four 36×54 inch prints
South West Esteem, 2009
Terra Cape, 2009, one of five 17×17 inch prints
Terra Cape, 2009
Tethered To Soth, 2009, one of five 17×17 inch prints
Tethered To Soth, 2009
Untitled (stars 6), 2009, one of four 6½×10¼ inch prints
Untitled (stars 6), 2009
We'll Watch Twin Peaks, 2009, one of three 36×54 inch prints
We'll Watch Twin Peaks, 2009
Williams Bridge, 2009, one of five 17×17 inch prints
Williams Bridge, 2009
Fallow The City Has Fields, 2008, one of five 4½×2¾ inch prints
Fallow The City Has Fields, 2008
Jeff Wall Dug Me A Mounta inches, 2008, one of five 36×54 inch prints
Jeff Wall Dug Me A Mountain, 2008

Select Exhibitions

Talks and Interviews

Education

2010 B.F.A. Honours in Visual Arts, York University, Toronto, Canada

Sponsors

Made possible with the support of

BNY Mellon, Donald O'Born, Leith Wheeler, Shrigley Battrick, Statoil, TD Bank Group.

The Ontario Arts Council